A VIDEO

olivia dunham, fringe season five

"I know that because I’m an anomaly. I have moved things with my mind. I’ve lit things on fire. I’ve caught bullets midair. I’ve seen things that people only dream about. I’ve seen… the seams between universes ripped apart, things that humans shouldn’t see. People make up explanations… assign meaning to things without knowing, because it’s reassuring. It’s comforting. But I can’t do that… because I know too much." 

Reblogged from Just one. I'm a few.
A VIDEO

orphan black + soundtrack

Reblogged from Just one. I'm a few.
A VIDEO
Reblogged from I walk like cursive
A QUOTE

White men make up approximately 36% of the population, but commit 75% of mass shootings. What would be called terrorism by any other skin tone is suddenly some mysterious unnamed disease. We as a society are perfectly happy to further stigmatize mentally ill people, who are far more likely to be victims of violence than commit violence, in the service of protecting white supremacy and male entitlement.

Reblogged from ameliorate or destroy
A VIDEO
"A strong woman is a woman determined to do something others are determined not be done."

Reblogged from what are you sayeeeeh
A QUOTE

To all those who don’t think the rape joke was a problem, or rape jokes are a problem.

I get it, you’re a decent guy. I can even believe it. You’ve never raped anybody. You would NEVER rape anybody. You’re upset that all these feminists are trying to accuse you of doing something or connect you to doing something that, as far as you’re concerned, you’ve never done and would never condone.

And they’ve told you about triggers, and PTSD, and how one in six women is a survivor, and you get it. You do. But you can’t let every time someone gets all upset get in the way of you having a good time, right?

So fine. If all those arguments aren’t going anything for you, let me tell you this. And I tell you this because I genuinely believe you mean it when you say you don’t want to hurt anybody, and you don’t see the harm, and that it’s important to you to do your best to be a decent and good person. And I genuinely believe you when you say you would never associate with a rapist and you think rape really is a very bad thing.

Because this is why I refuse to take rape jokes sitting down-

6% of college age men, slightly over 1 in 20, will admit to raping someone in anonymous surveys, as long as the word “rape” isn’t used in the description of the act.

6% of Penny Arcade’s target demographic will admit to actually being rapists when asked.

A lot of people accuse feminists of thinking that all men are rapists. That’s not true. But do you know who think all men are rapists?

Rapists do.

They really do. In psychological study, the profiling, the studies, it comes out again and again.

Virtually all rapists genuinely believe that all men rape, and other men just keep it hushed up better. And more, these people who really are rapists are constantly reaffirmed in their belief about the rest of mankind being rapists like them by things like rape jokes, that dismiss and normalize the idea of rape.

If one in twenty guys is a real and true rapist, and you have any amount of social activity with other guys like yourself, really cool guy, then it is almost a statistical certainty that one time hanging out with friends and their friends, playing Halo with a bunch of guys online, in a WoW guild, or elsewhere, you were talking to a rapist. Not your fault. You can’t tell a rapist apart any better than anyone else can. It’s not like they announce themselves.

But, here’s the thing. It’s very likely that in some of these interactions with these guys, at some point or another someone told a rape joke. You, decent guy that you are, understood that they didn’t mean it, and it was just a joke. And so you laughed.

And, decent guy who would never condone rape, who would step in and stop rape if he saw it, who understands that rape is awful and wrong and bad, when you laughed?

That rapist who was in the group with you, that rapist thought that you were on his side. That rapist knew that you were a rapist like him. And he felt validated, and he felt he was among his comrades.

You. The rapist’s comrade.

And if that doesn’t make you feel sick to your stomach, if that doesn’t make you want to throw up, if that doesn’t disturb you or bother you or make you feel like maybe you should at least consider not participating in that kind of humor anymore…

Well, maybe you aren’t as opposed to rapists as you claim.

A TEXT POST

An Open Letter to the Creators of “How I Met Your Mother.”

bookgeekconfessions:

Dear Creators of HIMYM,

Let’s talk about why we love your show.

We love your show because you created one of the most accurate representations of being a twenty-something in NY, trying to build a career while fostering friendships, searching for love and feeling the isolation that this city brings but honoring the incredible moments New York City affords. You created a show that was simultaneous laugh out loud funny and cry your eyes out heartbreaking. For that, we thank you.

You also effectively created a group of individuals who represented our generation in a way that we haven’t seen before and doesn’t exist elsewhere right now. We love these characters because they are layered, they make mistakes, they follow their own rules, and they’re better for it. They have grown with us. We have grown with them. They have seen us through our own heartbreaks, job trials, and friend tribulations. We’ve been with you since the beginning.

It’s not an exaggeration to say that in less than one hour you effectively broke the bond that we spend nine years building with these people. These people were our friends.  

Let’s talk about our friends.

Barney Stinson. What a guy? He’s actually the worst kind of guy but somehow you made him lovable. More than that you grounded him reality. You gave him depth. You slowly, subtly and brilliantly revealed his layers and allowed him to evolve and change. We watched Barney go from the playbook, to falling honestly in love and burning it. Barney’s evolution is one of the best on TV. His relationship with Robin grew from a place of respect and nurturing.  It was an amazing character arc, truly. 

Then, in a matter of minutes, you allowed him to regress, revert and deteriorate from that charming reformed ladies man to something worst than who he was in season 1.  We remember the moment where believed in Barney and Robin. When we realized that perhaps the show would not end with “just kidding kids, Aunt Robin is actually your mother!”  We believed when a bus hit Barney and his life flashed before his eyes, it was Robin that he saw. From there, you put us on a journey. We saw them fight it, get together, break up and once again unite in the most legendary of proposals. They were solid, in love and more importantly they accepted each other for the very flaws that past partners could not live with.

Barney ending his marriage with Robin over her successful career was more than a slap in the face (yes, it’s a reference to the slap bet) to his character development, but also a slap in the face all the people who grow and change as they learn what they want from life and love. Seeing the playbook once again in his hands and watching him chase after women half his age broke our hearts. He deserved more. His journey deserved more. 

And Lily, that beautiful firecracker, Lily’s journey has been one that we can closely relate to. For years, Lily chased her dream of being an artist. That dream led to her almost losing the love of her life, twice. But she believed in herself and needed to honor her desires. That dream pushed her from New York, to California and to Rome. That dream evolved, shifted and altered, but art was always there. We saw ourselves most in her when she cried believing that it was too late for her dream. But somehow you showed us it’s never too late. 

In this finale, her career is nothing more than a memory. Lily goes from a woman who managed to juggle marriage, children and work to a 1950’s caricature. She talks about her husband’s career, and pops out baby after baby. While Marshall is pursuing ambitions of being a judge what is Lily doing? Is she a stay at home mom?(Which would be fine, but is she?)  Does she have a part-time job? Does she work full-time and still manage to make it to Daisy’s dance recitals and Marvin’s baseball games? Or, does her life revolve around everything Marshall? How did this woman who we have watched for almost a decade end up? How was her story wrapped? How did it end? From the finale, we guess with many babies and her turning on her best girlfriend. 

Ted and Marshall both have their own inconsistencies but they get endings that honor their desires and character development in varying capacities. In fact Ted gets two happy endings, but more on that later. We could go more in depth on them, but we want to get to the real kicker. We want to get to the reason we felt impassioned to write this. The truth is, at one time or another we have seen ourselves in all of these people, but none more so than Robin Sherbatsky.

 Robin Sherbatsky is one of the best female characters to grace our television screens. She is strong AND feminine, invested in her career AND her love life. She is a woman who doesn’t apologize for who she is and what she believes in. She is the perfect role model for women in their twenties trying to pave their way in a world where women are valued solely on the size of their jeans. Her sense of self worth was NEVER connected to a man. She is a woman who knows herself, her values, her strengths, her weaknesses and her capacity for love.

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Couldn’t have said it better myself. Cosigned 100%

Though I’d add that I was also disappointed in Ted (not to mention they’d killed off Tracy who deserved way better than that). I was so proud of the moment in the previous episode where Robin said maybe I should be with you and Ted said no. You’re just afraid, you love Barney and he loves you. Get married. He’d finally grown up. And now here he is again with that damn blue french horn chasing Robin.